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CRUISE OF THE YACHT SAIDE.

   

The Advertiser, Wednesday 11 May 1892, page 6

CRUISE OF THE YACHT SAIDE.


After being away from Melbourne for eight months exactly the yacht Saide entered Victorian waters early on Monday morning (says the Standard). The Saide has arrived in perfect condition, being as taut and trim as the day when she left Melbourne. The vessel is lavishly appointed. The reception room, artfully inlaid with bevelled mirrors and built of carved English oak—all Melbourne manufacture -is a princely apartment, and carpeted as it is with the best of Brussels, furnished with a piano of English carved oak and luxurious lounge, is a room as resplendent with appointments as any onshore. The saloon is fitted up in the same costly manner, it too having walls of carved English oak, with bevelled mirrors glittering everywhere. Accommodation is made for eight persons, and even the revolving chairs are carved. From the dining saloon the cabins are reached, and here the same lavishness is apparent, Mr. C. G. Millar's (the owner) being like a palace. The apartments of the guests, too, are on the same magnificent scale. The quarters of the crew are good and substantial— better than many second-class passengers. The compound engines are in good order, and throughout the vessel she is scrupulously clean. On deck there is conspicuously situated a quick-firing Maxim gun, and passing through the various apartments the gleaming rifles and revolvers ensure safety from any attack by sea. Throughout the eight months' voyage fine weather prevailed, and with one exception— nearing Japan, when the jibboom was split— the Saide sustained no damage. Leaving Melbourne on September 9 she proceeded to Sydney, arriving there on the 12th. Staying there for nearly three weeks, a departure was made on October 4 for Brisbane, which was reached on the 6th. Six days later the Saide left for Noumea, and after arriving there on the 17th she cleared out for the New Hebrides Group on the 20th arriving on December 2. Departing two days later she touched at Yokohama, and on January 3 the Saide left for Kobe and anchored there on the 7th. She then went through the inland sea of Japan, and on the 27th headed for Nagasaki, reaching that port on the 31st. Nagasaki was sailed from on February 3, and Hongkong was the next port of call. Seven days later the British port was reached, and here Mr. Millar left his vessel. She left Hongkong an February 26 for Manilla, arriving there on February 30. Sailing on March 7, she anchored at Celebes Islands on March 14 and leaving a day later for New Guinea, stopping at several islands en route. She reached New Guinea on the 27th and the next day was on her way to Thursday Island, arrived at a day later. A run down to Cooktown, reached on April 6, started the homeward bound trip. Cairns was touched at the next day. Sydney was visited next on April 21, and after lying in Neutral Bay she left on Tuesday last for Melbourne. Dr. E. W. Way was one of Mr. Millar's guests during the cruise round the world. It is probable that Mr. Millar will return from Hongkong in a couple of months. During the voyage the Saide, when the weather was favorable, frequently covered 280 miles per day.

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